How Much Is A 1943 Halfpenny Worth Today?

The value of a 1943 halfpenny depends greatly on the condition of the example, but how much is a 1943 halfpenny worth today if you wanted to sell one right away?

For a good condition example, a 1943 halfpenny will sell for around £1. If your coin is in almost perfect condition it can be worth close to £10.

As with any old coin, there is a lot to learn about the 1943 halfpenny, so let’s get straight into it!

1943 Halfpenny Specifications

The dimensions for the 1943 halfpenny, as well as the mintage, can be seen in the table below:

Mintage76,200,000
Weight (g)5.4
Diameter (mm)25.5
MetalBronze

Is The 1943 Halfpenny Rare Or Valuable?

Given the mintage of the coin was just over 76 million, it’s quite safe to assume that the coin is not particularly rare.

It’s also worth considering that the pre-decimal halfpenny was only in circulation until 1971 when it was replaced by the decimal halfpenny which had a slightly different design.

This is reflected in the value of the coin being around £1 for a good example, with some dealers offering specimens for upwards of £10 in some cases.

Are There Any Other Versions Of The Coin?

In today’s age, just about every coin that is issued for circulation has proof versions that are available to buy from the Royal Mint, but things were not the same just less than 100 years ago.

Regular circulation coins were very rarely minted to commemorate certain events, as this was done in most cases by the Crown coin. Furthermore, the 1943 halfpenny was minted during World War 2 when precious metals weren’t exactly abundant.

It’s for these reasons that there is only one version of the 1943 halfpenny – the regular bronze circulated coin.

What Does A 1943 Halfpenny Look Like?

In terms of design, the 1943 halfpenny is iconic as it has the reverse design that was first issued in 1937 when King George VI came to the throne.

Reverse Design

1943 Halfpenny Reverse
Reverse Design – Credit

The reverse design of this era of halfpenny is instantly recognisable, portraying the Golden Hind of Sir Francis Drake, a galleon used by Drake to circumnavigate the world in the 16th century. A complete replica of the Golen Hind exists today in London and offers paid tours.

Towards the bottom, the inscription 1943 is found, with the inscription HALF PENNY at the top.

The initials HP are found to the right of the ship, representing the artist Thomas Humphrey Page who created the design.

Obverse Design

1943 halfpenny obverse design
Obverse Design – Credit

The obverse design features the bare portrait of King George VI with the artist’s initials HP underneath (Thomas Humphrey Page).

Around the edge the inscription GEORGEIVS VI D : G : BR : REX F : D : IND : IMP is seen, which translates to George the Sixth, by the Grace of God, King of all the Britains, Defender of the Faith, Emperor Of India.

What Was A Halfpenny Worth In 1943?

Back in 1943, the currency system was pre-decimal, which meant that the pound was split into 20 shillings, with each shilling worth 12 pennies.

So, a halfpenny was half of one penny, which itself was 1/12 of a shilling of which there was twenty per pound – pretty confusing right? In terms of buying power, a bar of soap was worth around 3 pennies in the 1940s, so you would need 6 halfpennies to purchase one.

It’s always interesting to look back at old coins to see what they were worth in their day versus how much collectors are willing to pay for them now.

Are Any Other George VI Halfpennies Rare?

In terms of George VI halfpennies, none of them are considered to be rare.

The rarest in terms of mintage is the 1951 halfpenny which had a mintage of just 14,888,000, much smaller than the 1943 version, but this coin is not worth a fortune by any means and sells for a few pounds in regular condition.

Final Thoughts

If you come across a 1943 halfpenny, you’ll be glad to know that they are worth much more today than they were almost a hundred years ago.

While they aren’t the rarest of coins, the design and historical relevance make them a worthy addition of any collection.